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Web Design Trends We're Thankful Are Gone As Thanksgiving approaches and 2014 draws to an end, there's a few web design trends we aren't sad to say goodbye to.

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Posted by dave on - Read

As Thanksgiving approaches and 2014 draws to an end, there's a few web design trends we aren't sad to say goodbye to.

  1. M. Versions of Websites (Separate Mobile Sites)
    As if maintaining a completely separate mobile version of your website wasn't enough of a deterrent, Google stepped up to say that they preferred responsive designs over separate "M dot" versions because responsive sites provided a better user experience and reduced duplicate content issues for search. Raise your hand if you've ever visited a mobile specific version and immediately started hunting for the "go to full site" link. That's all you need to know.
    Mobile website with click here for full site link
  2. Rotating Billboards
    People finally came to the realization that these features served little purpose beyond settling organizational disputes over whose content got featured on a homepage. Having hard data to prove that users don't really see past the first banner is finally killing these bandwidth vampires off. Read more about website carousel stats.
    ND.edu Feature Click-through Rates
  3. QR Codes
    Easily one of the most misused technologies from the last decade, the QR craze has finally died off. Mostly because people had such a hard time seeing their value. Marketers were just slapping QR codes on anything with no real thought behind it, and as a result this annoying technology never gained mainstream adoption. I have actually seen QR codes on webpages and in emails. Just think about that for a minute...take as much time as you need. Got some extra time? Check out these funny QR code fails.
    A QR code on an airplane banner
  4. Flash
    You know what people love? Working on their computer and getting interrupted by Adobe to update their Flash plugin. Thankfully, I can't even remember the last time I visited a site that utilized Flash, an encouraging sign for sure. I have stopped updating my browser's Flash player plugin. And you know what? I have not missed it. Good riddance to bad garbage.
    The dreaded Adobe Flash update screen
  5. Small Text
    In the earlier days of the Web, we had this collective delusion that we needed to ignore fundamental tenants of graphic design and try to cram EVERYTHING on a website "above the fold". One way we made so much crap fit was by making the text really, really, small and hard to read. Finally, people started saying "Man, I spend a lot of time reading on the Internet, I wish this text wasn't so damn hard to read. Plus, I can't read it all at once anyways, maybe we should bump this up a few sizes.". It took until 2014, but we're finally coming around on this one.
    Example of bad web design. Don't do this.

Got any web design trends you are thankful to see disappearing? Or are you sad to see any of the above go? Let us know in the comments.

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